BLACK COUNTRY COMMUNION: Rock legends deliver red-hot show at Hammersmith Apollo

BLACK COUNTRY COMMUNION: Rock legends deliver red-hot show at Hammersmith Apollo

This rare show of soulful, hard rock music and brilliant individual performances ensured that nobody was left disappointed.

In fact, the peerless live music that this supergroup produced from the moment they hit the stage brought the house down as band and fans came together in praise of a proper holy racket. 

With a stunning fourth album BCCIV recently released, this show was all about collecting together their best songs for a hair-raising performance that will be talked about for years to come.

The huge wheels of this mighty musical juggernaut were set in motion by a blaring air raid siren call before a blitz of snare drum and guitar exploded into a blistering Sway, from their most recent album BCCIV. 

Bedecked in patriotic Union Jack attire, Glenn Hughes pumped out his arms in salute of the band’s diehard fans as he led the way on the pulsing groove of One Last Soul. 

Now entering his late sixties Hughes’ voice seems to be improving with age, if that’s possible, as he effortlessly changed through the vocal gears of his unique multi-octave range.

It was an unparalleled joy to observe the masterly display of musicianship on show from these experienced board-treaders. 

Especially when uber guitarist Joe Bonamassa locked in with drummer Jason Bonham’s top thumping on the epic Save Me and hard rocker The Outsider.

Not forgetting Derek Sherinian’s hammering of Hammond organ and graceful glide of keyboards across Wanderlust and This Is Your Time, adding an ageless lustre to these now classic tracks. 

With so many top-notch songs and performances flowing freely from the stage, time seemed to stand still as Joe Bonamassa trilled the intro to The Battle For Hadrian’s Wall. 

A daring and fearless construction of this songs widescreen heroism followed with the band playing above and beyond expectations.

Similarly, the bar was raised higher when The Dubliner’s Gerry O’Connor joined the fray to play exquisite mandolin and violin on the blues-rock bravura of The Last Song For My Resting Place.

As the ‘Voice of Rock’ Glenn Hughes had the last words with a tight, lung-bursting take on Man In The Middle.  

Then his rumbling fuzzy bass riff and vocal gymnastics on Black Country solidified his legendary status.

An encore of Deep Purple’s Mistreated, with a Bonamassa master show of Fender Strat blues, tested Hughes’ helium powered voice, and the audience’s hearing, to sonic levels of superhuman ability.

Simply bringing out the absolute best in one another tonight, each band member raised their game achieving a higher plane of performance from song to song. 

A blitzkrieg of a show that will rightly go down in rock legend.  


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